Ceramic works by Akinsanya Kambon at Jack Shainman Gallery in New York City

 
On View presents images from noteworthy exhibitions
 

MAKING HIS SOLO DEBUT in New York City, Akinsanya Kambon is presenting figurative sculptures and wall reliefs at Jack Shainman Gallery. The ceramic works were made using an American raku firing technique, creating patinaed surfaces that have a striking iridescent luster. Born in Sacramento, Calif., Kambon is a U.S. Marine veteran, former Black Panther, and retired professor of art at California State University in Long Beach (1984-2010), where he continues to live and work. Kambon’s practice is informed by his rich background, spiritual aspects of his firing methods, and time spent traveling and living throughout Africa. The sculptures channel African histories, legendary West African gods and goddesses, and the artist’s Pan-African beliefs and commitment to community and knowledge sharing. Produced between 1994-95 and 2012-21 with four works undated, more than 20 sculptures are on view in the exhibition. CT

 

Works by Akinsanya Kambon are on view at Jack Shainman Gallery, 524 West 24th Street, New York, N.Y., from April 9-May 7, 2022

FIND MORE about the exhibition

 


AKINSANYA KAMBON, “King Leopold’s Soliloquy,” 2018 (raku-fired clay, 16 x 8 1/2 x 4 3/4 inches). | © Akinsanya Kambon. Courtesy the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York

 


AKINSANYA KAMBON, “Queen Mother of the Dogon,” circa 2016 (raku-fired clay, 34 x 16 x 16 inches). | © Akinsanya Kambon. Courtesy the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York

 


AKINSANYA KAMBON, “Queen Mother: Matriarchal,” 2021 (raku-fired clay, 23 x 9 x 10 inches). | © Akinsanya Kambon. Courtesy the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York

 


Installation view of Akinsanya Kambon, Jack Shainman Gallery, 524 West 24th Street, New York, N.Y. (April 9-May 7, 2022). | Courtesy the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery

 


AKINSANYA KAMBON, “Osanyin,” (raku-fired clay, 18 1/2 x 9 x 9 1/4 inches). | © Akinsanya Kambon. Courtesy the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York

 


AKINSANYA KAMBON, “Zambea,” 2019 (raku-fired clay, 21 1/2 x 9 x 8 inches). | © Akinsanya Kambon. Courtesy the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York

 


Installation view of Akinsanya Kambon, Jack Shainman Gallery, 524 West 24th Street, New York, N.Y. (April 9-May 7, 2022). | Courtesy the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery

 


AKINSANYA KAMBON, “The Hogon,” (raku-fired clay, 18 1/4 x 16 1/4 x 8 inches). | © Akinsanya Kambon. Courtesy the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York

 


AKINSANYA KAMBON, Detail of “Yemoja,” 2015 (raku-fired clay, 27 1/2 x 8 x 12 inches). | © Akinsanya Kambon. Courtesy the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York

 


AKINSANYA KAMBON, “Yemoja,” 2015 (raku-fired clay, 27 1/2 x 8 x 12 inches). | © Akinsanya Kambon. Courtesy the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York

 


AKINSANYA KAMBON, “Francois Mackandal and the Voodoo Priestess,” 2021 (raku-fired clay and copper, 16 x 18 1/2 x 3 1/2 inches). | © Akinsanya Kambon. Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York

 


Installation view of Akinsanya Kambon, Jack Shainman Gallery, 524 West 24th Street, New York, N.Y. (April 9-May 7, 2022). | Courtesy the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery

 


AKINSANYA KAMBON, “Abdominal Pains II,” 2013 (raku-fired clay, 21 1/4 x 6 x 8 1/2 inches). | © Akinsanya Kambon. Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York

 


AKINSANYA KAMBON, “Mythical Python of the Baga People of Guinea,” 2015 (raku-fired clay, 19 x 14 inches). | © Akinsanya Kambon. Courtesy the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York

 


Installation view of Akinsanya Kambon, Jack Shainman Gallery, 524 West 24th Street, New York, N.Y. (April 9-May 7, 2022). | Courtesy the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery

 


AKINSANYA KAMBON, “Prayers Up to God, Call Down the Rain, Dogon Queen,” 2013 (raku-fired clay, 21 1/4 x 9 inches). | © Akinsanya Kambon. Courtesy the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery

 


AKINSANYA KAMBON, Detail of “Shango,” 2019 (raku-fired clay, 33 x 11 1/2 x 9 inches). | © Akinsanya Kambon. Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York

 


AKINSANYA KAMBON, “Shango,” 2019 (raku-fired clay, 33 x 11 1/2 x 9 inches). | © Akinsanya Kambon. Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York

 


Installation view of Akinsanya Kambon, Jack Shainman Gallery, 524 West 24th Street, New York, N.Y. (April 9-May 7, 2022). | Courtesy the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery

 


AKINSANYA KAMBON, “Sundiata,” 2020 (bronze and human hair, 15 x 9 x 5 inches). | © Akinsanya Kambon. Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York

 


AKINSANYA KAMBON, “The Moor,” 1994 (raku-fired clay and copper, 12 x 15 x 1 1/2 inches). | © Akinsanya Kambon. Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York

 

FIND MORE about Akinsanya Kambon on Instagram and Culture Type

Akinsanya Kambon’s work is featured in “This Tender, Fragile Thing,” a group exhibition currently on view at Jack Shainman Gallery in Kinderhook, N.Y. (Jan. 15-April 30, 2022)

 

BOOKSHELF
Akinsanya Kambon (who was formerly named Mark Teemer) created a Black Panther Coloring Book in 1968 that is in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York (acquired in 2019). Kambon served as lieutenant of culture for the Black Panther Party’s Sacramento chapter. “Black Panther: The Revolutionary Art of Emory Douglas” explores the work of the organization’s national minister of culture who also served as art director of The Black Panther newspaper.

 

SUPPORT CULTURE TYPE
Do you enjoy and value Culture Type? Please consider supporting its ongoing production by making a donation. Culture Type is an independent art history project that requires countless hours and expense to research, report, write, and produce. To help sustain it, make a one-time donation or sign up for a recurring monthly contribution. It only takes a minute. Many Thanks for Your Support.