Self portrait of artist and his family, including former wife, photographer Deana Lawson. | © Aaron Gilbert

 
On View presents images from noteworthy exhibitions
 

THE COLLECTION of modern paintings assembled by the Columbus Museum of Art is largely the result of the largesse of private collectors who dating back to 1931 have donated their holdings. The museum’s contemporary collection has been greatly amplified by the addition of significant works from the Scantland Collection. Described as transformative, a promised gift of works by 27 up-and-coming artists was announced earlier this month, along with $2 million to endow the Scantland Family Executive Deputy Director of Learning, Experience and Engagement, a newly named position. The gift from Alan and Peggy Scantland, and their children and spouses, is the subject of a new exhibition, “Present Generations: Creating the Scantland Collection of the Columbus Museum of Art.” Many Black artists are represented, including Greg Breda, Jonathan Lyndon Chase, Somaya Critchlow, Jadé Fadojutimi, Derek Fordjour, Jerrell Gibbs, Aaron Gilbert (above), Lauren Halsey, and Deana Lawson. CT

 

“Present Generations: Creating the Scantland Collection of the Columbus Museum of Art,” is on view at the Columbus Museum of Art, in Columbus, Ohio, from June 25, 2021-May 22, 2022

FIND MORE about the exhibition

 


JONATHAN LYNDON CHASE, “Black Knight,” 2020 (acrylic paint, spray paint, marker, oil stick, plastic on muslin, 84 x 76 inches; Unframed: 84 3/4 x 77 3/4 x 1 1/2 inches). | Courtesy the artist and Company Gallery, New York, N.Y.

 


JADÉ FADOJUTIMI, “bosom. Blossom. bosom,” 2020-2021 (oil, oil stick and acrylic on canvas, 70 7/8 x 66 7/8 inches). | Courtesy the artist and Pippy Houldsworth Gallery, London, UK

 


SOMAYA CRITCHLOW, “The Weight of Silence,” 2019 (oil on linen, 33 x 23 1/2 inches; Framed: 34 1/4 x 24 1/2 x 2 1/4 inches). | Courtesy the artist and Maximillian William, London, UK

 


DEREK FORDJOUR, “STOCKROOM Ezekiel,” 2019 (mixed media, 144 x 108 x 120 inches). | Courtesy the artist and Night Gallery, Los Angeles, Calif.

 


DEREK FORDJOUR, “STOCKROOM Ezekiel,” 2019 (mixed media, 144 x 108 x 120 inches). | Courtesy the artist and Night Gallery, Los Angeles, Calif.

 


JERRELL GIBBS, “Lady in Blue Dress,” 2020 (acrylic, Oil stick on canvas, 80 1/4 x 70 1/4 inches). | Courtesy the artist and Mariane Ibrahim, Chicago, Ill.

 


LAUREN HALSEY, “The National Council of Negro Women Inc.,” 2020 (acrylic, mirror, sand, and objects on foam and wood, 94 x 158 x 45 inches). | Courtesy the artist and David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles, Calif.

 


ALEXANDER HARRISON, “Just Over the Hill,” 2021 (acrylic on panel, 4 x 4 inches). | Courtesy the artist and Various Small Fires, Los Angeles / Seoul

 


DEVAN SHIMOYAMA, “Page of Wands, 2021 (oil, colored pencil, glitter, Flashe, collage, jewelry and sequins on canvas, 84 x 72 inches). | Courtesy the artist and De Buck Gallery, New York, N.Y.

 


DEANA LAWSON, “Assemblage,” 2010-Present (drugstore photographs and specimen pins, size variable). | Courtesy the artist and David Kordansky, Los Angeles, Calif.

 


GREG BREDA, “What Shall I Cry,” 2020 (acrylic on vellum, 55 x 40 inches; Framed: 60 1/4 x 45 x 2 inches). | Courtesy the artist and Patron Arts, Chicago, Ill.

 


VAUGHN SPANN, “Greyson,” 2019 (Polymer paint, flashe paint, and terry cloth on stretcher bars, 84 x 80 inches; Unframed: 84 x 80 x 2 inches). | Courtesy the artist and Night Gallery, Los Angeles, Calif.

 

 

TOP IMAGE: AARON GILBERT, “Love Still Good,” 2021 (oil on canvas, 34 x 45 inches). | Courtesy the artist and P·P·O·W, New York, N.Y.

 

BOOKSHELF
Released earlier this year, “Jadé Fadojutimi: Jesture” is the artist’s first published book. “Deana Lawson: An Aperture Monograph” documents the practice of Deana Lawson, winner of the 2020 Hugo Boss Prize. The volume features 40 images with an essay by Zadie Smith and a conversation with the artist conducted by Arthur Jafa. Also consider “Lauren Halsey: Mohn Award 2018.”

 

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