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“Visionary Artist: Chris Ofili” by David Adjaye | Time Magazine
This week, Time magazine published its annual list of The 100 Most Influential People and Chris Ofili made the list of artists who are at the forefront of creativity. The tribute to the British painter, who lives in Trinidad, was written by his good friend the Ghanaian-British architect David Adjaye. He says Ofili has redefined art “by affirming the relevance of painting for the 21st century.” According to Adjaye, “[Ofili] asks questions about our time through intoxicating visual compositions that examine peripheral modernities and enable us to make sense of our world.”

“[Chris Ofili] asks questions about our time through intoxicating visual compositions that examine peripheral modernities and enable us to make sense of our world.” — David Adjaye

“Adam Pendleton: The Making of an Art-World Star” by Ellen Gamerman | Wall Street Journal
Under a headline declaring him an art “star,” the Wall Street Journal describes Adam Pendleton‘s practice as “a race-infused take on 20th century avant-garde” and cites the Richmond, Va.-born artist’s impressive bonafides. He has a residency at the Museum of Modern Art and is represented by Pace Gallery. The Journal reports his collectors include bold face names and that there is a wait list for his work at Pace, where his London exhibition recently opened and features new work inspired by the Black Lives Matter campaign. Next year, Pendleton, 31, is publishing his “Black Dada Reader.”

“Hank Willis Thomas Recalls the Past Century” by Antwaun Sargent | W Magazine
In his latest probe of representation in American media, Hank Willis Thomas has turned his attention to white women. W magazine takes a look at his exhibition “Unbranded: A Century of White Women, 1915-2015,” a new photo series at Jack Shainman Gallery that has a particular relevance given the launch of Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign and the scrutiny of her image as she strives to be the first female president. “I wanted to look at how perceptions of women’s roles and ‘whiteness’ have changed over the last century,” says Thomas. “None of us fit into the definition of our demographic.” CT

IMAGE: Chris Ofili. Photo by Ian Allen for TIME | via Time magazine

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